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Kabir Bedi honored by World Heritage Cultural Center

Kabir Bedi, the famous Bollywood star was presented with the World Heritage Cultural Center’s first Lifetime Achievement Cultural Award for his long, distinguished career in the arts. The awards ceremony was held April 5 at the TV Asia studios in New jersey. TV Asia Chairman H.R. Shah was also honored with WHCC’s Community Excellence Award. The evening was hosted by WHCC Board members Jyoti Soni and Victor Cruz.

Kabir Bedi has performed in film, television, and theater and is best known for roles in “The Bold and the Beautiful”, “Octopussy”, the Italian pirate series “Sandokan” (Sandokan), and over 60 Bollywood films including “Khoon Bhari Maang.” Kabir Bedi first film is Hulchul released in 1971. Some of the famous films in which Kabir Bedi acted are Hulchul (1971), Anari (1975), Nagin (1976), Aakhri Kasam (1979), Police Public (1990), Dil Aashna Hai (1992), Yagaar (1992), Kshatriya (1993), Salaami (1994), Kohram (1999), Kranti (2002), Maine Dil Tujhko Diya (2002), Talaash (2003), The Hero (2003), Rudraksh (2004), Asambhav (2004), Kismat (2004), Main Hoon Na (2004), Bewafaa (2005), Chakravyuh (2012). He has received several film awards, including Star Foundation Award in 2012.

The WHCC also announced plans for a new 30,000 square foot building, intended for the culturally diverse Brewster, New York, or Newtown, Conn. area, close to New York City. The facility will include an outdoor amphitheater and indoor theater, music recording studio, world library, lecture hall, class and conference rooms, event space including a grand ballroom, a WHCC press release said.

Founded in 2009, the WHCC has led more than 75 events with over 900,000 attendees in major U.S. cities. “There is a growing unmet need for real, in-person cultural connections,” founder Sattie Persaud said. “The new center for WHCC will enable us to meet that need for more people,” he added.

The center focuses on sharing cultural knowledge and creating a common ground for any culture in the world to interact. It also encourages those from other countries to keep their cultural heritage alive and celebrate and share their way of life through arts and food. It helps break down cultural barriers through education and community events. The new WHCC facility is the first of many planned across the country aimed to help communities to embrace diversity. WHCC plans to raise $200K by June 30 to purchase land for the center, with an intention of raising up to $6 million for the center’s completion.

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World Heritage Cultural Center honors actor Kabir Bedi, announces plan for new facility


Actor Kabir Bedi, center, interacts with the audience, as World Heritage Cultural center Board members Jyoti Soni, left, and Victor Cruz, look on. Bedi was honored with the WHCC Lifetime Achievement Cultural Award on April 5 at TV Asia Studios in Edison, New Jersey (Photo: Gunjesh Desai/Nayaface.com).

Actor Kabir Bedi was presented with the World Heritage Cultural Center’s first Lifetime Achievement Cultural Award for his long, distinguished career in the arts. The awards ceremony was held April 5 at the TV Asia studios here. TV Asia Chairman H.R. Shah was also honored with WHCC’s Community Excellence Award. The evening was hosted by WHCC Board members Jyoti Soni and Victor Cruz.

Bedi has performed in film, television, and theater and is best known for roles in “The Bold and the Beautiful”, “Octopussy”, the Italian pirate series “Sandokan” (Sandokan), and over 60 Bollywood films including “Khoon Bhari Maang.”

The WHCC also announced plans for a new 30,000 square foot building, intended for the culturally diverse Brewster, New York, or Newtown, Conn. area, close to New York City. The facility will include an outdoor amphitheater and indoor theater, music recording studio, world library, lecture hall, class and conference rooms, event space including a grand ballroom, a WHCC press release said.

Founded in 2009, the WHCC has led more than 75 events with over 900,000 attendees in major U.S. cities. “There is a growing unmet need for real, in-person cultural connections,” founder Sattie Persaud said. “The new center for WHCC will enable us to meet that need for more people,” he added.

The center focuses on sharing cultural knowledge and creating a common ground for any culture in the world to interact. It also encourages those from other countries to keep their cultural heritage alive and celebrate and share their way of life through arts and food. It helps break down cultural barriers through education and community events. The new WHCC facility is the first of many planned across the country aimed to help communities to embrace diversity.

WHCC plans to raise $200K by June 30 to purchase land for the center, with an intention of raising up to $6 million for the center’s completion.

To donate, visit mywhcc.org to donate, volunteer, or share their mission via social media.

Bedi with News India Times publisher Dr. Sudhir Parikh and TV Asia Chairman H.R. Shah (Photo: Gunjesh Desai/Nayaface.com)

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Cultural awareness through the arts at travel convention

A New York musician played the classical tunes of a violin on a stage. The artist then paused for a moment, brought his violin down to his waist and started rapping into the microphone. The musician, Svet Radoslavof, was one of many artists who took the stage at the Los Angeles Times travel convention to promote global awareness through the arts.

The Los Angeles Times Travel and Adventure Show was held at the Los Angeles Convention center. The travel convention featured vendors selling travel deals to various locations globally as well as a variety of travel-related workshops and promotions. People who attended the event were able to experience scuba diving in a small tank, learn how to take travel pictures, and were able to watch the Global Beat Stage.

The Global Beat Stage is produced by the World Heritage Cultural Center,  a not for profit organization who’s mission is to promote cultural awareness.  The traveling show showcases art, cultural traditions such as dance, music and food to the public. This event was created as a way for people to learn and experience different cultures without necessarily leaving their community. Viewers of the show were able to watch different culture related performances, such as a hip-hop/modern music violinist, Japanese dance, Thai boxing and Bollywood dance.

Radoslavof was one of many artists who performed culture related art on the “global beats stage” featured at the Los Angeles Times Travel and Adventure Show.

“Music is music, it is universal,” Radoslavof said. He said that music is a shared experience, and that one can learn a lot about a different community through their music.

Radoslavof performed several pieces during the event. He said he has been playing music since the age of five or six, and basically is a one-man show for his performances. He said that music is his passion, and that he sings, produces and plays the violin for all his stage acts.

The World Heritage Cultural Center was created by Sattie Persaud and Juan Carlos Gonzalez, who wanted to inform the public about different cultures, and what they can learn from traveling.

“We promote cultural awareness though the arts and food,” Persaud said.

Persaud said this particular show travels nationally. She said the show offers a wide variety of performances and connects with these performers in different cities.

Another performance on display at the cultural center was Bollywood dance. Bollywood dance received a lot of attention from the audience. The performance was organized by the Dance Conservatory of Pasadena. Performers wore colorful garb and got the audience to dance alongside them with their energetic dance.

Sue Desai, an audience member, danced a long with the Bollywood music. She said she is of Indian descent, and wanted to see the performance. She said she had a lot of fun dancing with the dancers and she appreciates seeing a dance act on stage related to her culture.